na sala ni ibe

Na sala ni ibe

Na sala ni ibe is made up of multiple copies of 9 individual images of mats and tapa (bark cloth) that have been digitally reimaged using a phone app.

This work aims to project Dulcie Stewart’s mixed-race identity through a contemporary reanalysis of traditional Fijian imagery and iconography, particularly through the use of repetitive geometric symbolism found in Fijian design elements.

Na sala ni ibe translates to mean ‘a path of mats’ – a Fijian term which describes the straight weave identified in woven pandanus mats. Into this, Dulcie incorporates irony, ideas of how each individual within her mixed-race, cultural marginalised family may choose to incorporate different aspects of their Fijian heritage whilst weaving their own, not so straight path. Just as the artist merges new technologies with traditional techniques, she creates a direct link between her ancestors and her families continuous migration.

Na sala ni ibe, a path of mats reimagined, transforms the experience of space and place, invoking feelings of belonging and a reflection upon the histories and traditions that each person carries along their unique path. 

This work is an ongoing project.

blakdot_opening

Na sala ni ibe: reassemble exhibited at Digital Natives: Return to Paradise, Blak Dot Gallery, Melbourne, 19 September – 6 October 2013. Photograph by Blak Dot Gallery. 

Na sala ni ibe: reassemble exhibited at Digital Natives: Return to Paradise, Blak Dot Gallery, Melbourne, 19 September – 6 October 2013. Photograph by Torika Bolatagici. 

na sala ni ibe 2015

Na sala ni ibe: reimaged exhibited at Fish Hooks and Moving Trees, BEMAC, Brisbane, Australia, 6 November 2015 - 16 January 2016; Bundaberg Regional Art Gallery, Bundabery, Australia, 3 February - 3 April 2016.